HCSI (Handheld Computer Software Interface)

From Federal Database

HCSI
Handheld Computer Software Interface
'The Brick' | Systems
HCSI.jpg

Dimensions

Height 203.2mm (8")
Width 312.42mm (12.3")
Depth 24.38mm (0.96")
Weight 1.28kg (2.82lbs)

Features

The Handheld Computer Software Interface (HCSI), nicknamed "The Brick", is a tablet computer used by Systems Technicians in their day-to-day work for a large variety of tasks. The HCSI is a tablet computer with a 12-inch, capacitive touch-screen, and a removable keyboard that doubles up as a protective screen cover, attaching via potent magnetic locks.

  • Full MIL-STD 811G compliant construction. Practically indestructible by all but the most adverse and direct conditions.
  • TEMPEST level information/emission shielding, preventing accidental loss and leaking of potentially secret or otherwise volatile data.
  • 128 core processor and a similarly powerful graphics processing unit, capable of performing at just over 400 petaFLOPS.
  • 512 petabyte storage unit with data-transfer rates close to exceeding 300 terabytes per second.
  • A comprehensive signal jamming device, capable of providing various facilities in order to hijack, alter, and completely jam most forms of electromagnetic signals. Also doubles as a signal broadcast device (and therefore wireless transmitter), capable of mimicking certain patterns and signals.
  • A universal, micro-servo actuated, optical-fiber and silver-plated gold-core wire, dense wavelength digital multiplex connector, capable of interfacing with standard and proprietary connection ports. Four meters long.
  • A custom-made operating system and suite of electronic warfare programs managed by a virtual intelligence designed to select the correct available facility and micro-manage processes at speeds quicker than the human user would be capable of.

Capabilities

The device's primary function is interaction with hostile systems and, as such, is capable of performing operations such as full system cloning, brute-forcing entry to secured systems, full system wipes, and mass-distribution of malicious software such as malware, trojans and keylogging programs. It is also capable of full, on-the-spot data recovery operations when time is not an obstacle and a more delicate touch is needed than simply removing the physical drives themselves.

  1. Full system cloning
    For smaller, isolated systems. For example, personal computers, laptops or PDAs. If it is possible, the indisputably best way of recovering data is by cloning the entire system. This is especially useful when it is suspected that complex data-denial techniques are in place that may compromise the target system. Generally, the only obstacle is space issues. Any systems with a larger size footprint than the HCSI is capable of holding are out of the realms of possibilities for this method.
  2. Brute-forcing
    Once connected to the system, the virtual intelligence will begin scanning procedures to determine the level of security within the target. It will then select the perceived best way of cracking the system and pause. It will display details regarding the hostile system including the estimated time needed for the operation, the chance of failure, and the details of the security. The virtual intelligence will then prompt the user with a choice; whether the virtual intelligence should attempt to be "quiet" and avoid detection by any active security, or whether the virtual intelligence should just attempt to be as quick as possible. This kind of forcing access to a secure system can take anywhere between a few seconds and a few hours, depending on how strong the security is.
  3. Full system wipe
    Given enough time, the device is capable of completely and totally wiping every trace of data on a system, just as thorough as any data destruction software. The device gives the user several levels of data destruction to choose from, ranging from surface level deletion (as simple as placing files in the recycle bin and emptying it), to complete and utter overwriting (ensuring the data is almost impossible to retrieve).
  4. Mass-distribution of malicious software
    Used as a distraction technique, or by spiteful operators, this function floods the system the HCSI is connected to with whatever malicious software is requested by the user. The device has a designated, sandboxed section of the storage unit to house the malicious software and when this operation is activated, the rest of the HCSI locks itself down temporarily so that it cannot be compromised while the software is being transferred. The most useful function of this operation is to distract security systems, reducing their effectiveness while they deal with the flood of viruses, malware, and trojans.
  5. Data recovery
    The opposite of the full system wipe, the data recovery function endeavours to use the HCSI's mighty processing power in an attempt to undo the work of data-deletion programs. This function also focuses on the removal, decryption (if necessary) and safe storage of potentially fragile and sensitive data.

Operating Instructions

Use of the HCSI is fairly simple and follows a few steps.

  1. Connect the HCSI to the system that you which to interface with via the universal connection cable, or establish a wireless connection via the wireless connection wizard.
  2. Once the connection has been established, select the function you wish to engage via the GUI.
  3. Follow the prompts and provide input where necessary.
  4. Ensure the functions to be executed are fully complete before disconnecting the HCSI from the system. (WARNING: Disconnecting the HCSI from the system while a function is still in progress may cause data loss and corruption)


DISCLAIMER


ANY UNAUTHORISED ACCESS TO SECURE FEDERATION SYSTEMS WILL TRIGGER AUTOMATIC FAILSAFES AND ALERT MILITARY INTELLIGENCE INTERNAL AFFAIRS. ANY ATTEMPT TO CIRCUMVENT SUCH FAILSAFES WILL BE CLASSIFIED AS DESTRUCTION OF FEDERATION MILITARY PROPERTY AND WILL BE DEALT WITH AS SUCH.